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Friday, June 26, 2009

Female Body in Photography Embraces Evolution

The female body in photography is neither a new concept nor a particularly radical one. The female body in photography evolved from the feminine form in art. Since females make up more then 50 percent of the species, it's not at all surprising that the female body in photography receives prominent notice.

The female body in photography covers a whole host of categories as well. The idealization of the feminine form can be found in fashion magazines that feature the trendiest new designs on the hottest young models. The idealization of the feminine form can be found in movie magazines about the escapades of actors and actresses. This idealization of the feminine form is present in soap opera magazines where a photogenic body is every bit as important to the storyline as the ability to act.

In the evolution of art, the female body in photography is merely the latest medium to embrace the feminine form. The paparazzi, of all photographers, work doubly hard at attaining the perfect picture of the famous or infamous in scandalous escapades in order to sell more newspapers. While it may seem cliché to classify all paparazzi as crude in their attempts at to capture scandal on film, it is true that they are guilty of objectifying the women whose images they are trying to capture.

Photographs of a topless Sarah Ferguson grabbed interest from tabloid magazines, newspapers and photographers seeking to provide the most reckless viewpoint. The female body in photography should be about the whole person, not just the quick buck that can be made.

It's more than just royalty that are objectified as a female body in photography by the paparazzi, but they are the best examples. But the female body in photography can do more than sell clothes, make-up, cars or trash. The female body in photography can raise the social consciousness, engender sympathy and even raise money for worthy causes. Profound images of women that graced magazine covers over the last two decades include Princess Diana, Margaret Thatcher, Mother Theresa, and a young Afghan girl whose image haunted the world not only for her vivid beauty, but also for the innocence amidst a war.

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