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Saturday, July 25, 2009

Underwater Photography of Models in Pools Gets Feet Wet

Cameras for underwater photography of models in pools can be pretty expensive. For the layman just getting a feel for it, the best bet is to buy the single use cameras. The single use cameras have the benefit of being virtually indestructible and inexpensive to boot. There's also the fun of fooling around with underwater photography of models in pools.

Learning a new skill, not to mention getting the chance to take lots of pictures of friends or family is an added benefit. Summer time is a great time to explore, experience and experiment. If the thought of capturing colorful and exquisite pictures of live coral reefs is stimulating, start working the kinks out of the process by practicing underwater photography of models in pools in the swimming pool.

Chlorinated water will give a much different light effect than can be found in the ocean. Go into the deepest part of an eight-foot swimming pool to take pictures of the legs above for underwater photography of models in pools. Come up for air and then dip down again, but stay closer to the surface. Take a few more. Shift the position of the camera and the angle. Try it from all sides.

By practicing the different methods of underwater photography of models in pools a person can get used to shifting light patterns. For a real variety, try the practice in the early morning, mid-afternoon, evening and after sunset. The multitude of different light levels will add a different depth and shading to each picture.

An instructor trying to determine the seriousness of his class in underwater photography of models in pools set up a unique exercise in the practice pool. The bottom of the pool was painted with a picturesque scene. Unbeknownst to the students, he used a trick with airtight canisters and snap glow sticks to create different patterns and shifts on the bottom of the pool. Every day, the students of underwater photography of models in pools met, the pattern had been changed. The change did not get noticed until two nighttime classes fell in a row. Students struggled to compensate for the oddly shifting light patterns and the instructor was satisfied. In the ocean, the light, weather, tide and much more can shift without a lot of warning, so understanding small shifts was an important lesson in underwater photography of models in pools.

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